Monthly Archives: February 2017

Flags of countries (2)


Flags of countries (2)**/*****
178px-flag_of_el_salvador-svg
200px-flag_of_australia-svg
200px-flag_of_honduras-svg
flag_of_argentina-svg
flag_of_armenia-svg
flag_of_botswana-svg
flag_of_estonia-svg
flag_of_guatemala-svg
flag_of_israel-svg
flag_of_the_czech_republic-svg
flag_of_the_netherlands-svg

Which of the following three flags belongs to the group above:
flag_of_monaco-svg
flag_of_norway-svg
flag_of_sudan-svg

You can check your solutions here

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Friday. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

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Cryptarithm: months


This time I present to you two cryptarithm: calculations in which every digit has been replaced by a letter.

Months 1****/*****

alphametic-2016-11-21-nr-1-months-exercise

Months 2***/*****

alphametic-2016-11-21-nr-2-months-exercise

You can check your solutions here and here

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Friday. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Calcudocu / K-doku / Calcdoku


Calcdoku problems, also called K-doku or Calcudoku were invented in 2004 by Japanese math teacher Tetsuya Miyamoto, who intended the puzzles to be an instruction-free method of training the brain. He used the Japanese name KenKen, which could be translated as ‘Cleverness’. In his classes, he sets aside about 90 minutes each week for solving puzzles. He believe that when students are motivated, they learn better, and he lets them do so at their own pace.
Other names used for this type of puzzle are Kendoku and Kashikoku naru Puzzle. The names KenKen and Kenduko are trademarked. Books are in Japan published by Gakken Co. In the USA the New York Times started publishing them in 2008. In my native Netherlands they appear regularly in both puzzle magazines and general magazines.

A calcudoku puzzle consists of a latin square – a latin square can have any size. If its size 4, the numbers 1 to 4 should appear exactly once in every rown and column exactky once. Similarly, if its size 5, the numbers 1-5 should appears exactly once in every row and column.
The square is subdivided into smaller areas, and the sum, product, difference or division result is given in the top left corner.

Here are two example puzzles.
1) 4×4**/*****
calcudoku-4x4-2017-01-10-nr-1-exercise

You can check your solution here

2) 5×5**/*****
calcudoku-5x5-2017-01-12-nr-1-exercise

You can check your solution here

3) 6×6****/*****
is an example puzzle, kindly offered by Jacques Min, who runs a website specialized in Calcudoku puzzles: :
calcudoku_justpuzzles

Techniques for solving them:
* http://www.conceptispuzzles.com/index.aspx?uri=puzzle/calcudoku/techniques
*

You can check your solution here

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Friday. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Takuzu / Binairo


Takuzu (often called Binairy/Binairo or occasionally Tic-Tac-Toe) puzzles have been around for several years. In my native Netherlands they have been published by both Sanders puzzles and by Denksport, and also in daily newspaper Algemeen Dagblad.
In France, they have been published under the name Takuzu in le Figaro, at least in 2011.

The puzzle consists of a rectangle or square with an even number of rows and columns. This is partly filled with 0’s and 1’s. It should be completed by the solver with 0’s and 1’s in such a way that:
a} There are never more than two consecutive 0’s or 1’s in any row or column;
b) There are an equal number of 0’s and 1’s in every row and column;
c) All rows and columns are different;
This last condition seems to be rarely used in the commercial publications. Sizes are usually 10×10, 12×12 or 14×14, though 6×6 and 8×8 are often offered as introduction puzzles.

Example 1:
binairy-puzzle-6x6

puzzle 1: 6×6:***/*****
binairy-6x6-2016-11-30-nr-1-exercise

puzzle 2: 7×7:***/*****
binairy-7x7-2016-11-30-nr-1-exercise

You can check your solutions here and here

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Friday. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.