Monthly Archives: August 2013

Pentominosa


1) 5×12 nr 1
Pentominosa 5x12 2013-07031 nr 1 exercise

1) 5 x 12 rectangle*
This 5×12 rectangle consists of the twelve different figures of 5 squares each. The original borders have been removed.
Each figure contains the letters A, B, C, D and E exectly once.
Can you find restore the borders between the twelve figures?

For those of you who are not familiar with them, here are the 12 possible pentominoes, or possible figures of 5 squares.

12 Pentominoes

This type of puzzle was, as far as I know, first published in the British magazine Games and Puzzles, issue no 50, july 1976.
There is a type of puzzle where all bones from the double 6 set are laid down in a 7×8 square. Sometimes that type of puzzle is called dominosa. You can find a couple of them on my homepage, the domino plaza. Because the type of puzzle is very similar, I have christened this type of puzzle pentominosa.

2) 5 x 12 rectangle*
Pentominosa 8x8 sq dist 2 2013-08-29 exercise

3) 5 x 12 rectangle**
Pentominosa 8x8 sq dist 1 2013-08-29 nr 1 exercise

You can check your solutions at here, here and here.

Please do not list the solution(s). In all other respects, I welcome discussion, listing alternative solutions, and I espoecially welcome your solution times, as that helps me to get an impression of the difficulty.

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Matchsticks – make 10 squares


Move 5 matchsticks to create exactly 10 squares.

Matchsticks 2x3 to 10 squares exercise

Can you find both solutions?
The credits for this puzzle go to my daughter Margreet. The credits for the second solution go to Kees Krol.

As usual, you are welcome to report your solution times and comment on the solution, but please do not give away the answer – that may spoil the fun for others. I will publish the solution in one or two weeks after posting the puzzle.

You can check your solution here

drawings


What’s special about the following sentence?

I am not very adept making awesome drawings.

As usual, you are welcome to report your solution times and comment on the solution, but please do not give away the answer – that may spoil the fun for others. I will publish the solution in one or two weeks after posting the puzzle.

You can check your solution here

two ropes


2 ropesThis week’s brain teaser comes from IitianWay, and I’d like to thank him for communicating it with me:

I have two ropes. Both are 1 meter long. Both will burn for exactly 1 hour. However, the speed with which they burn need not be evenly distributed over a rope. For example, the first 30 cm may burn in 30 seconds, while the other 70 cm takes the remaining 59,5 minute to burn.

How can I use them to measure 45 minutes?

As usual, you are most welcome to report your solution times and comment on the solution, but please do not give the answer – that may spoil the fun for others. I will publish the solution in one or two weeks after posting the puzzle.

You can check your solution here

Jimmy’s lemonade


1) Jimmy’s lemonade*
Billy's lemonade
Jimmy looked at the 5 pint can with cold pineapple lemonade on the table in his garden. That would suffice for the whole summer afternoon, he hoped. He had however not counted in his four friends. Soon they came running. Jack brought a 4-pint can, Jill and Janet each came with a 2 pint can while little James had managed to obtain a 1 pint can.

How many pourings did Jimmy need to give each exactly 1 pint of pineapple lemonade? It goes without saying that his friends would critisize every superfluous pouring, as each pouring meant the spilling of some of that lovely lemonade.

About two monthe agao I posted here a listing of all frequently appearing pouring puzzles. The one above was not listed there, but I came across it in Games and Puzzles issue 50.

You can check your solution