The ancient tablet


1) The ancient tablet**/*****
Some archeologists discovered an ancient tablet. After a concerted effort, the managed to translate four sentences:
Baruntas glizaval kama – the golden crown is hidden
Glu kama valet – the golden bracelet is revealed
Glizaval glu kazu – silver crown is revealed
Baruntas kazu valet – Silver bracelet is hidden

What does “kama valet baruntas” mean?

You can check your solution here

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Fridays. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

If you like this puzzle, you may be interested in my book with similar ouzzles.

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Bongard problem 13


The Russian scientist M.M. Bongard published a book in 1967 that contains 100 problems. Each problem consists of 12 small boxes: six boxes on the left and six on the right. Each of the six boxes on the left conform to a certain rule. Each and every box on the right contradicts this rule. Your task, of course, is to figure out the rule.

Bongard problem 13**/*****


You can check your solution here

You can find more Bongard problems here and at Harry Foundalis site, and in the category ‘Bongard problems’ in the right margin of this page.

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Fridays. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Cryptarithm – trees


Cryptarithm – trees***/*****
Both summations below can be translated into a correct sum by replacing every letter with a digit. The same letter always stands for the same digit and the same digit has always been replaced by the same letter.

cryptarithm-trees-exercise

You can check both your solution here

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Friday. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Matchsticks – hexagon


Last month we looked at some hexagon matchstick puzzles, and this month features some more.

1) Move 4 matches**/*****
From the figure above, move 4 matchsticks so that you have 4 triangles on unequal size.

2) Move 4 matches***/*****
From the figure above, move 4 matchsticks so that you have 6 triangles again.

You can check your solutions here and here.

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Friday. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Round about


1) Nr 1**/*****

1 Uttered short, shrill sound
2 occurring more typically than an alternative form
3 place for keeping explosives
4 found in the earthcrust
5 give and receive reciprocally
6 make anew
7 follow along behind
8 live forever
9 more than opponents
10 leave country

The letters around each numbered square are an anagram of the numbered clue.
The numbered squares should be filled with the first letter of each word of the solution
Together, the letters form a word.

This puzzle is a variation on the “Blokje om” puzzle, in Visie 2017 nr 16. Visie (vision) is a magazine published by de Evangelische Omroep (Evangelical Brodcast) in The Netherlands.

You can check your solution here

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Friday. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Bongard problem 33


The Russian scientist M.M. Bongard published a book in 1967 that contains 100 problems. Each problem consists of 12 small boxes: six boxes on the left and six on the right. Each of the six boxes on the left conform to a certain rule. Each and every box on the right contradicts this rule. Your task, of course, is to figure out the rule.

Bongard problem 34**/*****


You can check your solutions here

You can find more Bongard problems here and at Harry Foundalis site, and in the category ‘Bongard problems’ in the right margin of this page.

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Fridays. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Cities



(Illustration: Tiananmen square in Bejing, photo by Nowozin, license GFDL)
Cities****/*****
Have a look at the following cities:
Bejing
Cairo
Istanbul
New York
Sydney
Taunton, Massachusetts

Which of the following three cities also belongs in this group?
a) Amsterdam
b) Berlin
c) London

You can check both your solutions here

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Friday. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Truth-speakers, Liars and Switchers



The remote island of Zwrazr in the Logico archipelago is inhabited by three types of people: Truth-speakers, Liars, and Switchers. Truth-speakers always speak the truth, Liars always lie, and Switchers alternate their sentences between a true sentence and a lie.

As you arrive on the island, a group of three natives comes to greet you. According to tradition, the group consist of one representative of each group. Luckily for you, they introduce themselves:

  • The left one says: I am a truth speaker
  • The middle one says: I am a liar
  • The one on the right says: I am a switcher

So now you know who is who, don’t you?

You can check your solutions here

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Fridays. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Matchsticks – hexagon


Matchsticks puzzles are over a century old, but seem to go through a revival with several apps featuring them.

1) Move 3 matches**/*****
From the figure above, move 3 matchsticks so that you have 4 same sized triangles.

2) Move 4 matches***/*****
From the figure above, move 4 matchsticks so that you have 4 same sized triangles.

You can check your solutions here and here.

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Friday. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.