Dice puzzles old and new


Last month we had a look at the most famous of dice puzzles, the Polar bear puzzle. One of the beauties of dice puzzles is that, like playing cards, they are around in many bars.

I found an original dice puzzle in issue 70 of the long defunct British magazine Games & Puzzles, dated May/June 1978.

1) G&P issue 70***/*****



I’m not sure which one is older, the Polar Bears dice puzzle or the one in G&P.

You can check your solution here

2) 4 rolls of 4 dice***/*****



I’m not sure which one is older, the Polar Bears dice puzzle or the one in G&P.

You can check your solution here

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Bongard problem S3


Which rule satisfies the 6 figures on the left but is obeyed by none of the 6 figures on the right?
1)Bongard problem S3***/*****

In 1967 the Russian scientist M.M. Bongard published a book containing 100 problems. Each problem consists of 12 small boxes: six boxes on the left and six on the right. Each of the six boxes on the left conform to a certain rule. Each and every box on the right contradicts this rule. Your task, of course, is to figure out the rule.

You can check your solution here

You can find more Bongard problems here on this site and at Harry Foundalis’ site.

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Fridays. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Polar bears and other dice puzzles


Polar bears is no doubt the most famous dice puzzle around. I first heard it when I studied mathematics, and Douglas Hofstadters book “Godel, Escher, Bach” may have been the source.
If you want to puzzle your friends, roll 5 dice, and tell the how many polar bears can be spotted. Then roll 5 dice again, let them guess, and tell them the correct number if they guess wrong.

1) Polar bears***/*****
The polar bears puzzle is traditionally presented as a throw of 5 dice. If you are stumped, don’t despair, it is rumored that Bill Gates could only partially solve it.



Even though you may find it hard, I do encourage you to try to solve it before consulting the answer.

You can check your solution here

2) Seals***/*****
Polar bears hunt for seals. How many seals do you count?
This puzzle is inspired by the authors of https://www.pleacher.com/handley/puzzles/polrbear.html.


You can check your solution here

3) Fish***/*****
This puzzle too is inspired by the authors above, though in both instances I changed names to get a more logical picture.


You can check your solution here

Ages


Ages (1)**/*****
“Did you know that this year the sum of our ages is a multiple of 8?” Jill asked John.
“Yes,” Tom answered. “And did you know that next year the product of our ages is a three digit number consisting of three times the same digit?”

Ages (2)**/*****
“What a coincidence,” Bill said, who had overheard their talk. “Next year the product of the ages of Bess and me will also be a three digit number consisting of three identical digits. But this year the sum of our ages is a two digit number consisting two identical digits.”

What are the ages of John, Jill, Bill and Bess?

You can check your solution here

Bongard problem 19


Which rule satisfies the 6 figures on the left but is obeyed by none of the 6 figures on the right?
1)Bongard problem 19**/*****


In 1967 the Russian scientist M.M. Bongard published a book containing 100 problems. Each problem consists of 12 small boxes: six boxes on the left and six on the right. Each of the six boxes on the left conform to a certain rule. Each and every box on the right contradicts this rule. Your task, of course, is to figure out the rule.

You can check your solution here

You can find more Bongard problems here on this site and at Harry Foundalis’ site.

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Fridays. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Domino – lay out that set


Dutch puzzle designer Leon Balmaekers contacted me recently and told me he had written some booklets with puzzles for highly gifted children. The booklets are in Dutch, and contain a variety of puzzles. The highly gifted children in a classroom can make some of these puzzles when they have completed the normal exercises in a breeze.

One of the puzzle types uses a normal 0-6 domino set. Look at the figure in problem 1. In contrast to dominosa, the domino puzzle type most often used, the borders are clear, but the digits are missing.

Problem 1.**/*****
Domino_laydown_1_exercise
The numbers along the sides are the sum of the pips in the respective rows and columns. It is up to you to figure out which domino should go where. Normal domino rules are followed: whenever two bones lay end to end, the numbers are equal.

For your convenience, here is a complete double 6 set:
Domino_double_6_set

You can check your solution here

Problem 2**/*****
Domino_laydown_2_exercise

You can check your solution here

Problem 3***/*****
Domino_laydown_3_exercise

You can check your solution here

A new puzzle is published at least once a month on the first Friday of the month. Additional puzzles may be published on other Fridays.

Bongard problem 14


Which rule satisfies the 6 figures on the left but is obeyed by none of the 6 figures on the right?
1)Bongard problem 10**/*****

In 1967 the Russian scientist M.M. Bongard published a book containing 100 problems. Each problem consists of 12 small boxes: six boxes on the left and six on the right. Each of the six boxes on the left conform to a certain rule. Each and every box on the right contradicts this rule. Your task, of course, is to figure out the rule.

You can check your solution here

You can find more Bongard problems here on this site and at Harry Foundalis’ site.

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Fridays. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Bongard problem 12


Which rule satisfies the 6 figures on the left but is obeyed by none of the 6 figures on the right?
1)Bongard problem 12**/*****

In 1967 the Russian scientist M.M. Bongard published a book containing 100 problems. Each problem consists of 12 small boxes: six boxes on the left and six on the right. Each of the six boxes on the left conform to a certain rule. Each and every box on the right contradicts this rule. Your task, of course, is to figure out the rule.

You can check your solution here

You can find more Bongard problems here on this site and at Harry Foundalis’ site.

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Fridays. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

Three squares


What number goes to the question mark?

1) Nr 1**/*****

You can check your solution here

2) Nr 2**/*****

You can check your solution here

3) Nr 3**/*****

You can check your solution here

New puzzles are published at least twice a month on Fridays. Solutions are published after one or more weeks. You are welcome to remark on the difficulty level of the puzzles, discuss alternate solutions, and so on. Puzzles are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.